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Bojack Horseman - Season 1 _TOP_


While the first half of the season received mixed reviews, the second half of the season received much more positive reviews. Ben Travers of IndieWire believed one possible reason for mixed reviews of the show was critics reviewing only the first half of the season. Many critics cited the seventh episode "Say Anything" as being the turning point of the season, with it changing drastically in tone and developing a darker, deeper meaning.[3][4] This change was so drastic it resulted in IndieWire changing its policy to only review entire seasons of shows on Netflix, instead of just the first six episodes, which would have boosted BoJack Horseman's C+ grade.[5] This change in perception is starkly noticeable in the show's other seasons, which received critical acclaim on Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic.




Bojack Horseman - Season 1



The review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reported a score of 71%, based on 28 reviews. The site's critical consensus states, "It's intermittently funny, but in most respects, BoJack Horseman pales in comparison to similar comedies."[6] On Metacritic, the season received a rating of 59 out of 100, based on 13 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[7]


However, the second half of the season received much more positive reviews. Ben Travers of Indiewire believed one possible reason for mixed reviews of the show was critics reviewing only the first half of the season, with the second half changing drastically in tone and developing a darker and deeper meaning. This change was so drastic it resulted in Indiewire changing its policy to only review entire seasons of shows on Netflix, instead of just the first six episodes, which would have boosted BoJack Horseman's C+ grade.[13]


BoJack Horseman is an American animated sitcom created by Raphael Bob-Waksberg. The series stars Will Arnett as the eponymous character, BoJack Horseman, the washed-up star of the 1990s sitcom Horsin' Around. In the first season, BoJack plans his big return to celebrity relevance with a tell-all autobiography that he dictates to his ghostwriter Diane Nguyen (Alison Brie). BoJack also has to contend with the demands of his agent and on-again-off-again girlfriend, Princess Carolyn (Amy Sedaris); the misguided antics of his freeloading roommate, Todd Chavez (Aaron Paul); and his frenemy, Mr. Peanutbutter (Paul F. Tompkins), who also undergoes a tumultuous long-term relationship with Diane. The series satirizes Hollywood, celebrity culture, and the film industry.


During the course of the series, 77 episodes of BoJack Horseman were released, including one special over six seasons. The sixth and final season is split into two parts, the second part premiered on January 31, 2020.[1][2]


While the natural inclination of an animated show with talking animals is to draw comparisons to the works of Seth McFarlane, BoJack is far closer in spirit to the likes of Curb Your Enthusiasm, with long breaks between the laughs as the show tries to make you feel as uncomfortable and awkward as possible. It would be easy to watch the first episode or two and wave it off as a failed experiment, but much like the rest of Netflix homegrown content of late, it really does require the entire season to be watched before judgement can be passed.


There'll also be new seasons for BoJack Horseman, Degrassi: Next Class and My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic this month. This month, Netflix will debut the British crime series Marcella and the marijuana documentary called Rolling Papers. 041b061a72


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